Wednesday wine recommendations 12/13/2017

The holiday season is here, the month in which Americans buy the vast majority of sparkling wine sold in the United States. So throughout December, I will recommend a variety of bubblies from around the world, from good inexpensive fizz to high-end champagne. Stock up — if you don’t get to them all by New Year’s, they’ll help keep 2018 festive.

Michel Turgy Réserve Sélection Blanc des Blancs Grand Cru Brut

3 Stars

Le Mesnil sur Oger, Champagne, France, $48

Mesnil is an area in Champagne’s Cote des Blancs, where chardonnay (in my opinion) achieves its greatest expression. Wines from Mesnil are typically big and bold flavored (Krug being a prominent example), but Michel Turgy achieves a remarkable finesse and delicacy. And at this price, it’s a relative value. Alcohol by volume: 13 percent.

Distributed by Dionysus: Available in the District at Arrowine & Spirits, D’Vines, MacArthur Beverages, Rodman’s; on the list at Kapnos. Available in Maryland at Balducci’s and Bradley Food and Beverage in Bethesda, Wells Discount Liquors and Wine Source in Baltimore. Available in the Virginia at Arrowine & Cheese in Arlington, Balducci’s (Alexandria, McLean), J. Emerson Fine Wines & Cheese in Richmond, Vienna Vintner, Wine Cabinet in Reston; on the list at Nostos in Vienna.
Champagne Jean Michel Cuvée Cep Extra Brut

2.5 Stars

Champagne, France, $60

This wine is labeled “Champagne à l’état pur,” or champagne in its pure state. That means no additives to the wine and no sulfur used at bottling. As a champagne for the natural wine movement, it is a bit rough-and-tumble, with delicious fruit and a chewy texture that shows more brawn than delicacy. Its honesty kept drawing me back for another sip. ABV: 12 percent.

Distributed by Bacchus: Available in the District at Cordial (the Wharf), MacArthur Beverages. Available in Maryland at Remington Wine Company and Wine Source in Baltimore; on the list at Banditos in Easton, Marie Louise Bistro and Pen and Quill in Baltimore.
Contratto Extra Brut 2011

2.5 Stars GREAT VALUE

Italy, $30

The label says Contratto was the first Italian producer — about a century ago — to make sparkling wine in the traditional champagne style, with the second (bubbly) fermentation taking place in the bottle. It sports an over-the-top Belle Epoque label that promises hedonistic revelry, and it delivers. The wine bursts with delightful scents and flavors of raspberries, currants and white flowers. For bubbly fiends, it’s single vintage, with no dosage of sugar added at disgorgement. It’s not well known, but it is worth seeking out. ABV: 12.5 percent.

Distributed by Country Vintner: Available in the District at MacArthur Beverages, Rodman’s; on the list at Fiola Mare. Available in Virginia at Unwined (Alexandria).
Simonnet-Febvre Crémant de Bourgogne

2 Stars GREAT VALUE

Burgundy, France, $20

“Cremant” is a term for most French sparkling wines made in regions outside Champagne. The most common are Burgundy (Bourgogne), Alsace and Loire. Simonnet-Febvre is in Chablis, the northern part of Burgundy known for chardonnay. This cremant crackles with crisp bubbles and refreshing acidity, making it an ideal aperitif for a toast or to wash down appetizers. ABV: 12.5 percent.

Distributed by M. Touton Selection: Available in the District at Best in Liquor, Burka’s Wine & Liquor, Cairo Wine & Liquor, Capital City Wine & Spirits, Circle Wine & Liquor, Connecticut Avenue Wine & Spirits, Eye Street Cellars, Freedom Market, Harry’s Reserve Fine Wine & Spirits, Magruder’s, McReynold’s Liquors, Potomac Wine & Spirits, Rodman’s, Sheffield Wine & Liquor Shoppe, Sherry’s Fine Wine & Spirits, U Street Mini Mart, Virginia Market. Available in Maryland at Bethesda Co-Op in Cabin John, the Bottle Shop in Potomac, Bradley Food and Beverage in Bethesda, Clarksville Village Wine & Liquor, Cork & Bottle in Laurel, Eddie’s Liquors in Baltimore, Hillandale Beer & Wine in Silver Spring, Kenilworth Wine & Spirits in Towson, Midway Discount Liquors in Joppa, Old Farm Liquors and Spin the Bottle in Frederick, the Perfect Pour in Elkridge, Pine Orchard Liquors in Ellicott City, Potomac Beer & Wine in Rockville, Preserve Wine & Spirits in Hanover, Rodman’s (White Flint), Silesia Liquors in Fort Washington; on the list at the King’s Contrivance in Columbia.
Cricova Blanc de Noirs Pinot Noir Extra Brut

2 Stars GREAT VALUE

Moldova, $17

Moldova boasts the world’s largest underground wine cellar, as well as some really good inexpensive bubbly. Cricova makes a basic brut called Crisecco that is a stunner for about $12. This slightly more expensive blanc de noirs is robust with flavors of red berries and ripe peaches, over spicy gingerbread. ABV: 13.5 percent.

Distributed by Salveto: Available in the District at Chat’s Liquor, Cork & Fork, D’Vines, S&R Liquors; on the list at Ambar, Mintwood, Partisan. Available in Maryland at Dunkirk Wine & Spirits, Potomac Gourmet Market in National Harbor. Available in Virginia at Crystal City Wine Shop, Dominion Wine and Beer in Falls Church, Oakton Wine Shop in Oakton, Planet Wine & Gourmet in Alexandria, Screwtop Wine Bar & Cheese Shop in Arlington, Unwined (Alexandria, Belleview), Wine Outlet (Great Falls, McLean, Vienna), on the list at Ambar in Arlington.

Originally posted on WashingtonPost.com on December 2, 2017.

 

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Posted in Biodynamic, Champagne, France, Holidays, Italy, Natural Wine, Sparkling Wine, Washington Post | Leave a comment

Champagne Pannier Rosé Brut

img_5216Berries and roses, not whiskers on kittens; bubbles up noses, not warm woolen mittens. These are a few of my favorite things — in my glass!

Champagne Pannier Brut Rosé NV, 12% abv, $48.

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Dutton Goldfield Riesling – Marin County

I can’t say I’ve tasted many wines from California’s Marin County over the years. Marin for me is the scenic, Gucci-hippie oceanside territory I drive through on my way from San Francisco to wine country. Marin is not “wine country.”

img_5212But it can make some nice Riesling. Case in point: Dutton Goldfield’s 2016 Riesling from Chileno Valley Vineyard ($30, 327 cases produced). From a 25-year-old vineyard, this wine is dry but not tart; it has ripe tree fruit flavors of apricot and quince, and a talc-like minerality that evokes Austrian Riesling or Grüner Veltliner. And regular readers will know how much I love Austrian wines. The DG is soft in its acidity, yet dry. It’s a good conversationalist — by which I mean it engages you rather than simply talking at you. You know how some people — er, I mean wines — seem all-out determined to convince you how brilliant they are? This wine is brilliant, but it knows you have something to add to the conversation. I’ll stop there before I start raving about a wine’s emotional IQ. Kudos to grower Mark Pasternak and winemakers Dan Goldfield and Jeff Restel, for their emotional IQ.

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Christmas in Vienna

This gallery contains 14 photos.

Last year, I was lucky enough to spend this week in Vienna, Austria, for my day job. During the evenings, I braved the December cold to visit the city’s Christmas markets. My goal was to explore the city’s food, enjoy … Continue reading

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Wednesday wine recommendations, 12/6/2017

This week’s recommendations include two delicious wines made from Semillon, a grape too often ignored by producers and consumers. Plus, we have an exotic white wine from Italy, an intriguing “natural” wine made of grenache from southern France, and an inexpensive Champagne that shows this luxury wine does not have to command luxury prices.

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Mendel, in Argentina’s Mendoza region, has long produced an excellent Semillon.

Mendel Semillon 2016

3 Stars

Mendoza, Argentina, $26

I’ve always wondered why Semillon is not more popular with winemakers or consumers. Traditionally, it plays second fiddle to sauvignon blanc in white Bordeaux, but it can be delicious on its own. It has more body and richness that sauvignon blanc, with flavors of fig and pear and delightful, refreshing acidity. Mendel’s Semillon is racy and intense, with impressions of stones and minerals more than fruit. The acidity will help it age well, but it drinks beautifully now, especially if you open it about an hour before dinner. ABV: 13 percent.

Distributed by Bacchus in the District and Maryland, Roanoke Valley in Virginia: Available in the District at Wide World of Wines. Available in Maryland at Wine Merchant in Lutherville. Available in Virginia at Grand Cru in Arlington.  

L’Ecole No. 41, Semillon 2015

2.5 Stars GREAT VALUE

Columbia Valley, Wash., $18

L’Ecole No. 41 has been a Semillon stalwart for years. This version is fruity and vibrant; it should age well for several years but is hard to resist right now. ABV: 14.5 percent.

Distributed by Country Vintner: Available in the District at Magruder’s, Rodman’s, Wardman Wines. Available in Maryland at Decanter Fine Wines in Columbia, Eastport Liquors in Annapolis, Maple Lawn Wine & Spirits in Fulton, Pine Orchard Liquors in Ellicott City. Available in Virginia at Aldie Peddler in Aldie, the Wine Outlet in Great Falls.

Chapuis & Chapuis Grenat 2016

2.5 Stars

Vin de France, $ 25

This is a “natural” wine from southern France, made from grenache. It has a bit of spritz from carbon dioxide, meant to preserve the wine in lieu of sulfur. Decanting it, or even opening the bottle and leaving it alone for several hours, will let the wine open up. It will also keep for a few days if you can resist finishing the bottle. ABV: 13.5 percent.

Distributed by Bacchus: Available in the District at Cordial (the Wharf), MacArthur Beverages. Available in Maryland at Remington Wine Company and Wine Source in Baltimore; on the list at Banditos in Easton, Marie Louise Bistro and Pen and Quill in Baltimore.

Ottella Lugana Bianco 2016

2.5 Stars

Italy, $19

Trebbiano is usually made into simple, nondescript white wines, the type you drink before getting down to business (as in, before the red wines). The Ottella Lugana, however, is a serious wine, with tropical fruit flavors to match seafood salads and pastas, or lighter poultry dishes. Simply delicious. ABV: 12.5 percent.

Distributed by Kysela: Available in the District at MacArthur Beverages, Magruder’s. Available in Maryland at College Square Liquors in Westminster, Maryland Discount Beverage Center in Cumberland, the Perfect Pour in Elkridge, Petite Cellars in Ellicott City. Available in Virginia at Arrowine and Cheese and the Italian Store in Arlington, Basic Necessities in Nellysford, Bottle & Cork in Alexandria, Classic Wines in Great Falls, Foods of All Nations in Charlottesville.

Kirkland Champagne Brut

2 Stars GREAT VALUE

Champagne, France, $20

When I was shopping at CostCo for my feature on the best-selling inexpensive wines in America, this champagne caught my eye. Not only is it inexpensive – decent champers starts at $30, and good ones generally cost $40 and up – but it is produced by Manuel Janisson. Virginia wine fans will recognize him as the French partner in Thibaut-Janisson, Virginia’s top sparkling wine. This Kirkland blend may be the sparkling wine of the year. It is perfectly balanced, with flavors of ginger, cloves and apples. ABV: 12 percent.

Exclusive to CostCo in the District and Virginia.

[Note: After this appeared in The Washington Post on Nov. 29, a reader told me of a different experience with Kirkland Champagne, with two bottles at the same party performing very differently. With big box store labels, it is always important to note the producer, when possible. My experience was limited to one bottle, and I was attracted to it because of the Janisson name. My reader did not know if the two bottles he experienced were made by the same producer or potentially two different producers. There are, of course, other reasons for bottle variation.]

Posted in Bargain Wines, Biodynamic, Champagne, France, Natural Wine, Sparkling Wine, Wine | Tagged , | Leave a comment

The Thanksgiving wine conundrum …

Every November, wine columnists warn us about the difficulty of pairing wine with the traditional turkey & trimmings we feast on at Thanksgiving. It’s all silly, and most writers hate the theme. I know I do. I’m not looking forward to writing one this year (and still may not), partly because I don’t know how I’d improve on the one I wrote last year. Here it is, posted Nov. 12, 2016, on washingtonpost.com:

All together now – deep breaths. Relax. Stay calm. Don’t sweat about the wine for Thanksgiving.

Yes, it’s time for my annual reminder that you have much more to worry about than selecting wine for the holiday feast. There’s the menu, the timing, the seating arrangements around your loud relative who won’t stop talking even as he’s stuffing his maw with your food.

To be honest, the great national anxiety over what wine to pair with turkey is a hob-gobble-goblin invented by wine writers desperate to stuff an article with sage advice to a logical question – what wine is best with the bird? A cottage industry of wine snobbery developed around the concept that turkey is a wine killer. Nonsense. A turkey is just a big chicken! Whatever you drink with chicken will do just fine with turkey.

(I’m not making this up. Hugh Johnson, the venerable British wine writer I profiled a few weeks ago, published his first article in the British edition of Vogue magazine in 1960 – about pairing wines with Christmas turkey. The article is included in an anthology, Hugh Johnson on Wine: Good Bits from 55 Years of Scribbling.)

The wine/food conundrum for Thanksgiving is the plethora of dishes, spices, and flavors on the table and on our plates, all at once, rather than in orderly courses.  Too often our food-wine pairings become food-protein pairings, and we forget the sauces, spices, textures and well, vegetables, that are also part of our dining experience. (Beware the canned cranberry sauce.)

So my usual advice: Open one of everything. Or at least, a wide assortment or wines that will match well with the variety of dishes on your Thanksgiving table. Find wines you enjoy at prices you can afford for the occasion. For example, pinot noir is a classic favorite because of its ability to play well with a variety of foods. But you may not want to buy premier cru Burgundy unless you’re having turkey dinner for two. Feel free to offer a nice pinot from Oregon or California.

Don’t think of Thanksgiving as a wine challenge but an opportunity. Make a game of it – open several wines of various grapes and styles, then compare each of them with every dish on your table. While you’re avoiding conversation with your relatives, you’ll give yourself a clinic in wine and food pairings. What you learn will carry you through until next year’s Thanksgiving.

Here’s what you should look for: Bubbles go with everything. Sparkling wines, from champagne to Spanish cava, are extremely versatile. The bubbles are palate-cleansing and refreshing, especially with salty or deep-fried dishes.

Fruity white wines, such as Riesling or Gruner Veltliner, are also friendly with a wide variety of foods and flavors. From bone-dry to sweet, Riesling can match nearly every dish’s acidity, spiciness or texture. If umami could be quantified, Riesling would be off the charts, it’s so classically versatile with a wide variety of foods.

If you prefer red wines, pinot noir, barbera and gamay are classic pairs with a wine variety of foods. Syrah and nebbiolo are also good choices on the heavier end of the spectrum. More powerful reds such as cabernet sauvignon or merlot can clash with your buffet due to their tannins and astringency.

This year, I’ll be thankful for friends and family, as well as this wonderful country of ours. And I’ll be especially thankful there is plenty of wine in my house.

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It’s not about the #wine.

This is a slightly revised version of my column published October 12 on washingtonpost.com.

As I write this, fires continue to spread across Northern California’s wine country for a sixth day, and it is still impossible to estimate the full impact of this catastrophe. Just this morning, new evacuation orders were issued for parts of Sonoma and Healdsburg, and a new fire erupted in Lake County. People are still fleeing their homes and desperately trying to protect their families, pets, and livelihoods.

If you’ve ever visited Napa or Sonoma counties, you know someone affected by this disaster. Maybe you have friends or family there, or a favorite winery you visit and order wine from every time you’re in the area. Perhaps you remember that cheerful woman who poured you a taste at Signorello winery in Napa’s Stags Leap District or at Paradise Ridge winery near Santa Rosa, where you lingered to watch the sun set into the Pacific in the distance. Perhaps that waiter who so enthusiastically explained the daily specials and the wonderful zinfandel available by the glass at Willi’s Wine Bar. Signorello, Paradise Ridge and Willi’s are gone, as are many more of our favorite places to stay, visit or taste.

On the second morning – Tuesday, October 10 – NPR aired a piece by a KQED reporter who visited the Atlas Peak area of Napa County, where the first fires broke out late on the evening of October 8. She spoke of million-dollar homes consumed, “Bentleys burnt to their metal frames,” and an infinity pool “cracked by the intense heat of the flames.” I shouted at my radio: What about the winery workers who live in the valley, or the migrant laborers who came north for the harvest? A mobile home retirement community in Santa Rosa was decimated, as were several stores and fast food restaurants.  The charred hulks of cars in the news photos were Corollas and Civics, not Bentleys. Those hotels that burned down, the Hilton and the Fountaingrove Inn – rich people didn’t stay or work there. This is a calamity for everyone, not just the wealthy.

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